Login
Username

Password

Remember Me

Learn how to register!
or
Forgot your password?
Request a new one!
Support
Like on FacebookLike on Facebook
Vote for AVATAR at TopMudSites!
Vote for AVATAR on TMC!
Follow us on Twitter
Donate to AVATAR using PayPal - Thank you!
Polls
What is your favorite anniversary event?
- view results -
Newbie Tip
If everything goes suddenly dark...try using a light. Candles and lanterns are readily available for purchase from Nom, Sol or Jim the Peddler, but it is always best to bring some spares along. - Calidon
Users Online
Guests Online: 22
No Members Online

Member Count: 524
Newest: Korynth
View Thread
Avatar | Public | Creative
Page 1 of 2 1 2 >
Author Book Recommendations
Thranx
Member

Posts: 2
Location: Houston, TX
Joined: 28.01.07
Posted on Nov 08 2008 00:01
If there are any books that you would recommend reading, please post them here. Thanks.
g11TX guy1113@hotmail.com guy1113
Author RE: Book Recommendations
Wiseman
Member

User Avatar

Posts: 26
Location: Seeking hidden knowledge
Joined: 28.01.07
Posted on Nov 08 2008 16:08
Kylie Chan's Dark Heavens series is my current favorite:
White Tiger
Red Phoenix
Blue Dragon

I also like
Sword of Truth series by Terry Goodkind
David Gemmell's works (especially the waylander books)

let me know if you are looking for more and I'll make a longer list


Wiseman
-----------
English does not borrow from other languages. English follows other languages into dark alleys, raps them over the head with a cudgel, then goes through their pockets for loose vocabulary and spare grammar.
-Mama_Willowe
1625704 wyvaud@gmail.com http://users.tpg.com.au/wyvaud/avatar_races/races.html
Author RE: Book Recommendations
Riviat
Moderator

User Avatar

Posts: 91
Location: UK
Joined: 14.07.05
Posted on Nov 09 2008 07:58
Here are various series that I've read and enjoyed.
They are by no means a complete list of the authors works so it would be worth checking out what else they've done if you try them and like them.

Anne McCaffrey
Dragonriders of Pern series
Brain and Brawn ship series
Crystal Singer series
Talent Series

Elizabeth H Boyer
World of the Alfar series
Wizard's War series

David Eddings
- The Belgariad series, The Malloreon series
- The Elenium series, The Tamuli series

Raymond E Feist
Riftwar Saga series
Serpentwar Saga series
Darkwar Saga series

Julian May
Saga of the Exiles series
Galactic Milieu series

James Barclay
Chronicles of The Raven

Neil Gaiman
American Gods
Neverwhere
Stardust

Simon R Green
Deathstalker series
Forest Kingdom series
Nightside series
Secret History series

Robin Hobb
Farseer Trilogy
Liveship Trilogy

Patrick Thomas
Murphy's Lore series

Nancy A Collins
Sonja Blue series

RA Salavatore
Icewind Dale series
Dark Elf series
Legacy of the Drow series
Spearwielder's Tale series
Author RE: Book Recommendations
Cerdwyn
Moderator

User Avatar

Posts: 35
Location: Southern California
Joined: 23.06.06
Posted on Nov 09 2008 21:29
I think a lot depends on WHAT you like to read, what style, etc.

I fell in love with the Murphy's Lore series the first time Patrick Thomas was at Ubercon. So did my daughter. It's light and funny and fantastical. Not sure how else to describe it.

On the other hand, my daughter loves Lovecraftian works and so really also enjoys the work of C.J. Henderson. What he writes that is not Lovecraftian in genre' is often on the Noir side of things.

I used to read a tone of hard science fiction. I don't much anymore. We've come to the point it is hard to be realistic without going out toward fantasy. I do read medical science fiction when I can find it. It's not real common. No, not horror, science fiction. And I enjoy a good space opera and can still read E.E. 'Doc' Smith and enjoy it (*wink Nadreck*).

"The Alchmyst' by Michael Scott was fun to read, as was it's sequel, "The Magician'

I also really enjoyed S. M. Stirling's "Dies the Fire" and "Sunrise Lands" series. They are connected post apocalypse stories that are very well done.

Anyway, good luck




Cerdwyn, Staph Immortal of Avatar MUD

Avatar.... the Legend Continues

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

Any sufficiently advanced MUD is indistinguishable from magic.
Author RE: Book Recommendations
Morague
Member

Posts: 9
Location: Creston, BC, Canada
Joined: 27.07.07
Posted on Nov 10 2008 20:52
My all time favorite - the Thomas Covenant series by Stephen R Donaldson. It is a little hard to get into the first book for several chapters, but once you get past that the whole series is phenomenal - you will even meet up with Nom

Hmm, maybe I will start it over again.
Author RE: Book Recommendations
Daeron
Member

User Avatar

Posts: 19
Location: Eastern Canada
Joined: 23.03.06
Posted on Nov 13 2008 18:22
A series I've been recommending to all my friends that enjoy fantasy-type is The Lies of Locke Lamora by Scott Lynch. The first book in the series, "The Gentlemen Bastards" was fantastic and I am currently reading the second in the series.
Another great series I was recently introduced to was The Song of Ice and Fire by George R. R. Martin. Lots of characters, lots of story and written in a different style. Every chapter is from the point of view of a different character in the story.

Daeron



Mind over matter.
daeron@outland.org
Scrambled Trout 2944684
Author RE: Book Recommendations
Zahri
Member

Posts: 65
Joined: 22.11.06
Posted on Nov 16 2008 23:40
The Song of Ice and Fire rocks! There are... four books out now? Nice and hefty tomes. Just keep in mind the author is currently going through writer's block. His last official post was New Year's Day of this year, where he said he hoped to have it in bookstores by this fall...didn't happen.

I've found that if you do read this series, you will find a lot of Avatarians to talk with about it. Though some of us have forgotten the details, it has been a long enough wait for the next book.
http://www.angelfire.com/journal2/avatar
Author RE: Book Recommendations
Wiki
Member

Posts: 3
Joined: 05.10.08
Posted on Nov 17 2008 03:03
Zahri wrote:
The Song of Ice and Fire rocks! There are... four books out now? Nice and hefty tomes. Just keep in mind the author is currently going through writer's block. His last official post was New Year's Day of this year, where he said he hoped to have it in bookstores by this fall...didn't happen.

I've found that if you do read this series, you will find a lot of Avatarians to talk with about it. Though some of us have forgotten the details, it has been a long enough wait for the next book.


to tide you over read the hedge knight I and II. they take place 100 years (?) before the song of ice and fire. definitely, great short stories
Author RE: Book Recommendations
Riviat
Moderator

User Avatar

Posts: 91
Location: UK
Joined: 14.07.05
Posted on Nov 17 2008 07:34
Michael Scott Rohan
Winter of the World series

William Horwood
Duncton Wood series

Peter Morwood
Tales of Old Russia/Prince Ivan Trilogy
Horse Lords series
Clan Wars series
Author RE: Book Recommendations
Kariya
Member

Posts: 49
Joined: 28.06.06
Posted on Nov 21 2008 03:03
Zahri wrote:
The Song of Ice and Fire rocks! .....

I've found that if you do read this series, you will find a lot of Avatarians to talk with about it. Though some of us have forgotten the details, it has been a long enough wait for the next book.


That's why I'm rereading them now. Fun

This list of course can not be complete without mentioning the man that is for a part responsible for my frame of mind.

Michael Moorcock.
The original Elric series rocked my world and the recent trilogy blew my mind.

Where his stories started out as relatively simple hack n slash, he took his Multiverse and Eternal Champion concept and turned it into something that can easily be considered a philosphy or a religion.

There are a lot of books that tie into the multiverse and the tales of the Eternal Champion. Corum, Erekose, Hawkmoon, Von Bek, etcetera etcetera all have their own series.

And a definite shout out to "Behold the man" if you like books that can be considered blashpemous that is. *grin*
It is about a time traveller who discovers Jesus is not the man the bible claims he is. So he decides to interfere.
http://home.wanadoo.nl/distortedmind
Author RE: Book Recommendations
Riviat
Moderator

User Avatar

Posts: 91
Location: UK
Joined: 14.07.05
Posted on Nov 21 2008 07:23
Kariya wrote:
[quote]Zahri wrote:

Michael Moorcock.
The original Elric series rocked my world and the recent trilogy blew my mind.

Where his stories started out as relatively simple hack n slash, he took his Multiverse and Eternal Champion concept and turned it into something that can easily be considered a philosphy or a religion.

There are a lot of books that tie into the multiverse and the tales of the Eternal Champion. Corum, Erekose, Hawkmoon, Von Bek, etcetera etcetera all have their own series.


I'm not sure I've read the Elric ones but I know I read the Corum, Hawkmoon and Von Bek ones. Well worth checking out.

Actually, it's been so long since I've read them that I think I'll try again.
Thanks, Kariya for the reminder!
Author RE: Book Recommendations
Daeron
Member

User Avatar

Posts: 19
Location: Eastern Canada
Joined: 23.03.06
Posted on Nov 26 2008 20:26
Yeah, GRRM has been lagging behind on the next release.. BUT... did you hear that a pilot is to be given to HBO for a mini series based on the Song of Ice and Fire (www.cinemablend.com/television/HBO-Orders-Song-Of-Ice-and-Fire-Pilot-13371.html)? I can't wait -- Great series and I love many of the HBO series. Also, if you are reading this series or need a refresher www.towerofthehand.com is a great site for info on chapters, characters, etc.


Zahri wrote:
The Song of Ice and Fire rocks! There are... four books out now? Nice and hefty tomes. Just keep in mind the author is currently going through writer's block. His last official post was New Year's Day of this year, where he said he hoped to have it in bookstores by this fall...didn't happen.

I've found that if you do read this series, you will find a lot of Avatarians to talk with about it. Though some of us have forgotten the details, it has been a long enough wait for the next book.



Mind over matter.
daeron@outland.org
Scrambled Trout 2944684
Author RE: Book Recommendations
Longbeard
Member

Posts: 1
Joined: 02.12.08
Posted on Dec 04 2008 11:08
I'm a GRRM fan as well. I've read the ASoIaF series about 3 times through already. But he's written a lot of other great stuff. I recommend Fevre Dream (vampires circa late 1800's), Armageddon Rag (murder mystery) and the Wild Cards series (origin of superheroes/villians and beyond). Unlike the A Song of Ice and Fire installments, his other books tend to be shorter although of comparable quality.
Author RE: 17th anniversary trivia books
Izanagi
Administrator

User Avatar

Posts: 8
Location: Japan
Joined: 25.06.08
Posted on Aug 23 2012 15:36
In my recent trivia quest relating to Sci-Fi and Fantasy books I drew on 28 different authors across both genres. The one thing which all of them have in common is that I have enjoyed them all at one time or another and rate them highly as good reads - not neccessarily for all in all cases, but at the very least in their sub-genres.

My three top recommended authors and their series are:

Chronicles of an Age of Darkness - Hugh Cook: A tragically mostly out of print series of 10 books which are exciting, humourous, very well written and challange the basic precepts of the genre. A wonderfully tapestried series of books, any of which can be read as a stand alone, but work even better as a series. We have a wonderful set of main characters who are very flawed and very real thrust into a variety of situations which they scramble to deal with, and keep scrambling. The journeys are very enjoyable and packed full of wonderful people, places and events. Probably my favourite author to date. As an aside, Hugh Cook was also a big influence on the author China Mieville. If you ever see any second hand copies of these - check them out.

The Malazan Book of the Fallen - Steven Erikson: Excellent prose in an truly epic series, with a caste of thousands. High fantasy with truly characters ranging from the truly godlike to the extraordinarily ordinary. At times serious and deep, heart wrenching and poigniant - at others hilarous and laugh out loud. We are thrown into the story of a world, right in the middle and a great deal of the enjoyment is finding our own feet and not having story elements and plots spoon-fed to us. With a sense of history which spans epochs and interesting and original magic basis, this has to be the best fantasy series in the last fifteen years.

The First Law - Joe Abercrombie: Modern Fantasy Noir. Gritty and exciting with the main characters all falling into the anti-hero category. This trilogy sets us up in Abercrombie's world, and then he continues with another 2 stand alone books which are even better - and has just published a 3rd. read them in order for the best effect. Another writer who expertly mixes humour with serious issues, action with introspection and who challanges a lot of the expectations of the genre Abercrombie is doing excellent work in bringing fantasy out of its teens and into a mature adult genre.

Other Fantasy Books of Note:

A Song of Ice and Fire - George RR Martin: Now famously a HBO drama with two seasons under its belt. This is currently on book 5 of a projected 7 book series. Excellent writing of a fairly low fantasy style, with quite a lot of emphasis on intrigue and written from the viewpoints of a range of different characters. The downside is that it will probably be another ten years before books 6 and 7 put in an appearance.

Dragonlance Chronicles - Margeret Weis & Tracy Hickman: Based on a Dungeons & Dragons series of adventures, these somewhat pulpy books were some of the first of their kind, and are the forerunners which almost all others have had to live up to, including RA Salvatore's Drizzt series. Classic fantasy that anyone who has ever played Dungeons & Dragons or indeed, has mudded on Avatar. THIS is what so much of Avatar is based on, in one form or another.

The Lies of Locke Lamora - Scott Lynch: Along with it's sequel, these two books form the beginning of a series which promises to be an excellent addition to Fantasy Noir, or gritty fantasy sub-genre. Realistic with flawed heroes and sophisticated plots, this book also is very well written.

The Elric Saga - Michael Moorcock: Part of Moorcock's classic Eternal Champion series, these books represent a classic glimpse of fantasy writing at its most popular at the time. For many, Elric represents the defining word in Sword and Sorcery and the albino prince with a soul eating sword is an iconic ambiguous hero.

Lord of the Rings & The Hobbit - JRR Tolkein: Tolkein is the father of modern fantasy and these books are manditory reading for all lovers of fantasy. The Hobbit is a much easier read, written for his young son. The LotR is much heavier and slower going and viewed through modern eyes it has its flaws and seems in places stereotypical. Remember though, this is where the stereotypes came from and this is pretty the original. Before this, fantasy was myth, legend and fairy stories for the main part with the sole exception of some early pioneers.

The Black Company Series - Glen Cook: A barebones series of books stripped of flowery prose, and populated by characters of rather practical morality. These books tell the story of a mercenary company and their exploits.

Howl's Moving Castle - Diana Wynn Jones: A children's book, recommended particularly for kids aged 8-12. Like most of Wynn Jones books these are equally accessable to younger readers as they are to adults. A delight to read and pleasantly well written this is one of her best offerings, but there are many, many more. She has sadly passed away now, but has left a great legacy behind.

In Science Fiction:

Lord Valentine's Castle - Robert Silverberg: The first of a series of books written over several decades by one of Science Fictions great writers. Particularly adept as the master of the short story, here Silverberg paints a deeply real and fascinating world and ties it together with an engaging and enjoyable story.

The Left Hand of Darkness - Ursula K LeGuin: Another classic name from Science Fiction, she is perhaps better known for her EarthSea series. LeGuin tells a tale of isolation, sexuality and integrity in very powerful novel heavily influenced by the Cold War. Beautifully reflecting many of the pressing issues of the day, this still has the power to move.

The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams: A comedy series of books which can make you literally cry with laughter. Like many comedic books too much of a good thing can numb the senses, so these are recommended to be read spaced apart to maximise enjoyment. A fabulously funny space romp, while at the same time shooting some rather pointed arrows at our own real world foibles and society.

Saga of the Pliocene Exiles - Julian May: A series of 4 books, which also had a rather good prequel (which unlike some prequels, SHOULD be read afterwards) describing the lot of misfit humans sent back in time to dwell amongst sabretooth tigers and the like, safely away from a future 'perfect' society - only to discover a race of warring aliens have beaten them to it. Fabulous descriptions of mental powers, and excellent weaving of Celtic (as well as other) mythoi into a new and original setting.

The Commonwealth Saga - Peter F Hamilton: A space opera duology set in a high-tech galaxy where we have conquored the stars. Lots of action, plenty of characters, tech galore - these are two of Hamilton's best books and a great introduction into his writing.

The Culture Novels - Iain M Banks: Banks has written books about, or featuring the Culture for decades now. They are stand alone - though true afficianados can sometimes spot references to one book or another. They are written in an often ambiguous time line and can really be read in any order. Very high tech in general, each book deals with different issues and are often written with somewhat different styles and agendas.

Snowcrash - Neal Stephenson: Ome of the best, and probably most famous of the Cyberpunk genre after William Gibson's Neuromancer. This is in my opinion Stephenson's best work and is a quality read. Almost all you need to know about it is that is starts off as pzza deliveryman by the name of Hiro Protagonist (master swordsman and cyberhacker) desperately tries to make sure that he is not late - or his mafia bosses are NOT going to be happy.

The Chronicles of Mavin Manyshaped - Sherri S Tepper: Tepper's feminist writing style can be seen herein early form in this wonderful tale of the True Game, a land where people with speical powers 'game' against eachother. Half fairy tale, half science fiction, all good read. Tepper's later more famous books such as Grass owe a great deal to earlier and highly enjoyable works.

Yesterday's Son & Time for Yesterday - AC Crispin: For fans of Star Trek, some of the novels set in the Star Trek universe are excellent ways to get insights their favourite characters or a deeper understanding of the Trek universe. As with any of these kind of spin offs, it really does depend heavily on the quality of the writer and your own personal attachment to the character's involved. Based on the original episode All Our Yesterdays, in which Spock is stranded in the prehistoric past, AC Crispin does a great job for the fans.

The White Dragon - Anne McCaffery: Just one of the famous Pern series which is straddles the fantasy/science fiction genre - on a planet ravaged by alien destructive rain, only the dragon riders can burn the deadly thread from the sky. A strong book, like many of McCaffery's earlier works these books are thoroughly enjoyable and the tale unfolds within a familiar background and touches on many already met characters and introduces new ones. It should be noted that there IS a natural conclusion to this series and the author's failure to realise that has damaged the series as a whole. In short, early books good - later books... not so much.

The Honor Harrington Series - David Weber: Space pulp at its best. Essentially, the Napleonic Wars in space. These books are heavy on war, and detailed descriptions of space battles and the tactics involved. Interspersed between them we are introduced to a host of characters and our heroine is confronted with villinous, treacherous, or honourable enemies alike. Not high literature at all, but a pleasure none the less as the writing is good enough to draw us in to a 'ripping yarn' style of tale.

The Uplift Saga - David Brin: In a universe where life stretches back untold millenia in a chain of genetically improved creatures, who in turn go on to foster new races of there own... Humans are an upstart race who have had the efrontary to appear on the scene without a parent race - claiming the impossible - to have 'evolved'. This is the story of how the universe reacts to such temerity. Brin usually writes solo books, but here we see a series of 6 and we are drawn ever deeper.

The Time Machine - HG Wells: HG Wells is one of the founding father's of science fiction and this tale is quite literally years ahead of its time. A must read for all those who are interested in the history of where the genre has come from, and still a decently told story in its own right.

Dune - Frank Herbert: An epic series, Herbert does a wonderful job of drawing us into the tale and making his universe feel real and whole, while at the same time, we never quite feel comfortable there. Exploring the issues of free-will and what it means to be human, we are also caught up in a political drama with a good balance of action to philosophy.

Helliconia - Brian Aldiss: Telling the story of a planet and the paired society of humans and phagor over hundreds of years, Aldriss presents a world which suffers generations of winter and then vice versa of summer. The humans prosper in summer, while the minotaur-like phagor reign supreme in winter. An interesting set of books, made more so by the lack of any real main character, we can slowly watch an unfolding history.

Tarzan of the Apes - Edgar Rice Burroughs: One of the earliest 'Science Fiction' type stories - we are asked the question what if there were a race of intelligent apes, and a man was brought up amongst them? Shockingly crude in style at some places, eye opening in the casual attitudes of the day, this really is a fascinating historical record of how far we have come and how things have changed - in literary style and social values. Yet, it is also a testament that a good story is still a good story.

A Game Book

Lone Wolf - Joe Dever: While this is fantasy, this is actually a series of chose your own adventure books. Steve Jackson's Fighting Fantasy series are probably the best known of this genre of books. Very much aimed at kids no older than early teens, I have no idea if these kind of books are even popular any more in the face of computer games. Before there were computer games, and before there were MUDS, if you wanted to play a fantasy game and were on your own - these kind of books were the answer. Lone Wolf is a particularly series and follows a story more than 30 books long, allowing your character to develop, gain items, powers and make their own choices. Sound like anything you know?

For more recommendations and reviews, I suggest www.goodreads.com as a surprisingly good site. The more books you rank, the more appropriate the suggested reading list is.
Author RE: Book Recommendations
Vanusk
Member

Posts: 8
Joined: 08.03.07
Posted on Aug 23 2012 15:51
One of my personal favourites is Jim Butcher, he has a fantasy series called Codex Aleria which I quite enjoyed. Additionally Butcher has another series that is more Urban Fantasy called the Dresden Files that I highly recommend.

Additionally, I have quite enjoyed the books in the Kingkiller Chronicle by Patrick Rothfuss. They're interesting and have kept me hooked waiting for the next installment.

Something a little less Fantasy that I have enjoyed are the books by the author Christopher Moore, his stuff is more satirical and usually quite fun.

Please note, these are just some of the books I have enjoyed, so don't get up in arms if you don't like them.
-V


Vanusk/Elfis
Author RE: Book Recommendations
Neyne
Member

Posts: 14
Joined: 28.01.07
Posted on Aug 23 2012 17:27
Roadside Picnic is pretty excellent science fiction about a zone of territory that is mysteriously transmuted by unknown forces, and the political, scientific, and black market communities that mingle around it. Prose has a strange cadence because it's translated from Russian, but it's charming in its own way. It inspired the movie Stalker (not particularly great), which in turn loosely inspired the 2007 video game S.T.A.L.K.E.R., which is rather spectacular on its own.
Author RE: Book Recommendations
Rakshasa
Member

Posts: 5
Joined: 30.09.09
Posted on Aug 24 2012 04:12
The Belgariad, David Eddings - fond memories, I read the ten books 4 times
Game of Thrones, G.R.R. Martin - I should read this again!
The sword of truth, Terry Goodkind - ended up bored but I spent nights reading the 5 first books
Jeez how could I have missed the DISCWORLD saga, Terry Pratchett??? (must start with the two first tomes, they were hilarous)
Farseer, Robin Hobb - was absolutely great
I was frustrated that Roger Zelazny died before ending his Chronicles of Amber
I also really liked La voie du sabre, Thomas Day (author is french, not sure if translated in english)


Time is of the essence.
Author RE: couple more authors
laazarus
Member

Posts: 35
Joined: 21.12.07
Posted on Sep 11 2012 10:05
first, i love a bunch of the ones mentioned. so nice to see Moorcock mentioned, the Elric books were so important to me as a youth, right up there with Tolkien.

perhaps my favorite author atm, China Mieville - Railsea, his latest. anything is awesome, if you haven't read any i'd start with Perdido Street Station for the more fantastically inclined, otherwise Iron Council which is more like his newer stuff, a bit easier to read and less obviously fantastical. his book Un Lun Dun seems like it was meant for adolescents, good, definitely easier to read. Kraken was awesome, a sort of Lovecraftian detective novel. King Rat also, which like Kraken has the city of London as a major part.

another author i like a lot - Neal Stephenson - Anathem was great though a bit challenging sometimes, and his latest REAMDE was a seriously fun page-turner and should really appeal to people on AV in it's content (MMORPG, contemporary culture, etc).

- Laazarus et al
Edited by laazarus on Sep 11 2012 10:07
Author RE: a tale of Jinn
laazarus
Member

Posts: 35
Joined: 21.12.07
Posted on Sep 19 2012 11:42
"Alif the Unseen" is, i think, the first novel from author G. Willow Wilson. it's similar to some science fiction and fantasy but also i think quite different in two ways. first it's based in the middle east and uses that culture and mythology for many references. second, it is not afraid to use religious elements in various fashions.

as a person who has read a ton of speculative fiction i found it refreshingly different and a page-turner, over all a great book.
Author RE: Book Recommendations
Izanagi
Administrator

User Avatar

Posts: 8
Location: Japan
Joined: 25.06.08
Posted on May 22 2013 23:12
I'be just discovered that one of my favourite authors is having his first book turned into graphic novel form and it is being distributed on the web for FREE!

There are only about 30 pages up so far, but the writers/artists are putting out three new pages a week - and it is eventually going to be available for purchase in hard copy for those who want to own it in physical form.

Check out Joe Abercrombie's 'The Blade Itself' here: http://www.firstlawcomic.com/
Page 1 of 2 1 2 >
Jump to Forum:
 

18289321 Unique Visits

Powered by PHP-Fusion v6.01.18 © 2003-2007

Shoutbox
You must login to post a message.

Vanusk
Nov 18 2018 19:35
Looking for an imm to help fix Loso. Please let me know when one of you is available.

Xiphoid
Jul 18 2018 19:08
Service provider outage currently ongoing, check status at https://status.lino
de.com/


Kerrinth
Jan 21 2018 12:28
We're back now! Sorry all, there was an outage on our service provider side (it seems) and that caused everything to go down.

laazarus
Jan 21 2018 12:00
doesn't seem to be a network issue as ping and traceroute respond pretty well.

Helram
Jan 21 2018 12:00
No idea, guess it's more than a crash.

Shoutbox Archive
Game Updates
Jan 23 2019 00:54
The Ultimate Dragon viewing room is now closed!
Jan 23 2019 00:39
The Ultimate Dragon viewing room is now open for business! Come witness the carnage!
Jan 21 2019 21:45
Amore has remorted into a High Elf Druid.
Jan 21 2019 13:07
Asit successfully morphs from Hero 911 to become Lord Asit.
Jan 21 2019 10:07
Valiyaha has become a Green Dragon.